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Want to know how we check for subluxation?

We regularly get asked about different chiropractic adjusting techniques and why we would choose one over another.

There are over 100 named chiropractic adjusting techniques. Because spinal subluxations have several components, it’s not a surprise that they can be corrected in different ways. That is the beauty, and sometimes confusion, about chiropractic – adjusting techniques can vary from one chiropractor to another.  Adjustments can even vary for the same person from one visit to the next depending on how their spine and nerve system are responding to subluxations.

We adjust using a combination of Diversified, Thompson, Chiropractic Biophysics, Drop Table and instrument assisted adjusting. Our intention, is to first identify subluxations, and then apply the most specific, scientific chiropractic adjustment possible. One of the ways to objectively assess for subluxation is by performing a leg length check. You may have noticed that I’ve been using that check quite frequently. It’s a technique used to check for subluxations in your sacrum (tailbone), pelvic bones or your upper neck, depending on how it’s used. It’s helpful to elevate your feet a bit when using this check so that’s why the foot piece on our tables are often slightly raised.

When chiropractic was in its early stages, the initial understanding was that subluxations were simply bones out of place putting pressure on nerves. While that is an important component of subluxation, there is also loss of normal motion, joint degeneration, soft tissue (ligaments/tendons) changes, muscle tension, inflammation, and most importantly loss of normal nerve activity. The nerve scan (surface EMG) we check you with periodically measures changes in muscle activity as a result of subluxation. It tells us about short term spine and nerve system stresses.

You may have also noticed that I use a white hand held instrument. It is a very sensitive infrared thermometer that measures variation in skin temperatures. If subluxations are present, there will be a difference in temperature due to inflammation or changes in blood flow. Just like when you are stressed, embarrassed or anxious (fight or flight response), subluxations interrupting normal nerve activity can create temperature variation. If you have more questions about our assessment or techniques, let us know!

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